Tag Archives: Army Reserve

News Flash! Army Reports on Delayed PTSD

Delayed PTSD, Depression,

Family Conflict Data Revealed

Picture by AlyssaAS

Picture by icolman (Creative Commons License – Find it Here)

This study reported in Army.Mil/News found that out of 88,000 returning Iraq war soldiers given Post-Deployment Health Assessments (PDHA), only 4 to 5% of the soldiers assessed in the 18 months prior to Dec 2006 were found to have PTSD, but 3 to 6 months later that number jumped to 20.3 % for active duty soldiers and to an alarming 42.4% for reserve-component soldiers.

We are talking about the same soldiers, delayed PTSD symptoms.   There were other delayed complications/symptoms.  Reported depression symptoms doubled and family conflicts rose from 3.5 to 14 % active duty and from 4.2 to 21.2 % for reserve-component soldiers.

Here is the report:

Army Study Finds Delayed Combat Stress Reporting

Nov 14, 2007
BY Elizabeth M. Lorge

WASHINGTON (Army News Service, Nov. 14, 2007) – In a study that will appear in the “Journal of the American Medical Association” Wednesday, Army medical officials examined increased Soldier-reported mental-health concerns in mandatory post-deployment health screenings.

Cols. Charles Milliken, M.D. and Charles W. Hoge, M.D., two of the study’s authors, found that between the initial Post-Deployment Health Assessment and the Post-Deployment Health Re-assessment three to six months later, Soldiers are more likely to report signs of post-combat stress and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

“These efforts are about taking better care of Soldiers,”said Col. Milliken, the principal investigator at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research’s Division of Psychiatry and Neuroscience during a media roundtable at the Pentagon Friday. “What we’re hoping to do with the screenings is detect mental health problems while they are still small, simple and temporary. When these problems get bigger and more complicated, they are much harder to treat and it increases the likelihood that they will become a chronic, long-term problem.”

The study examined the assessments of 88,235 Iraq veterans completed between June 1, 2005 and December 31, 2006, and found that while only 4 to 5 percent of Soldiers were referred for mental healthcare on the PDHA, three to six months later that number jumped to 20.3 percent for active-duty Soldiers and 42.4 percent for reserve-component Soldiers.

The second set of numbers encompasses the PDHA, PDHRA and Soldiers who were under mental-health care because of self-referral or employee-assistance referrals. According to Col. Milliken, these Soldiers were not necessarily diagnosed with PTSD, but they were exhibiting symptoms that were serious enough that a medical provider wanted to have them evaluated.

Similarly, symptoms of depression reported on the PDHA rose from 5 percent to 10 percent on the PDHRA.

The highest jump the study found between the PDHA and PDHRA were reports of conflict with family and friends. This rose from 3.5 to 14 percent for active-duty Soldiers and 4.2 to 21.1 percent for reserve-component Soldiers.

Although the study didn’t examine causes and effects, Brig. Gen. Stephen L. Jones, assistant surgeon general for force protection, who has deployed twice, suggested Friday that the PDHA numbers may simply be skewed because Soldiers are so happy to go home and haven’t yet interacted with their families.

“When you come back, you’re feeling great, almost euphoric. You don’t have any problems in the world. You’re just glad to be home. And then over the next three-four weeks, you re-establish relationships with your family and the normal stress everybody feels when they return home starts to surface. This is a normal, adaptive response and we would expect the stress levels at home to go up,” he said.

The disparity between active and Army Reserve and National Guard Soldiers was a bit more challenging for the study’s authors, especially because they determined that combat exposure for Reserve and National Guard Soldiers was virtually identical to that of active-duty Soldiers, and they reported more physical health concerns as well.

Col. Milliken believes this may be due to the differences in health coverage for reserve-component and active-duty Soldiers. Active-duty Soldiers can go to sick call any time, so he said they may not feel as pressed to report every little concern, but Reserve and National Guard Soldiers only have six months of TRICARE coverage when they return and two years of Department of Veterans Affairs benefits. After that, the VA will pay for service-related injuries or illnesses, if they are documented on forms like the PDHRA.

The PDHRA adds a question about alcohol use, and while 11.8 percent of Soldiers admitted that they might be misusing it, only 0.2 percent of these were referred for a treatment program and still fewer were seen within 90 days.

While acknowledging the Army has a long way to go when it comes to alcohol treatment, and sight the lack of confidentiality as a real roadblock, both Brig. Gen. Jones and Col. Milliken said they were encouraged that so many Soldiers were even willing to report that they had a problem, because the PDHRA becomes part of a Soldier’s permanent medical record.

They also believe that the Army’s efforts to reduce the stigma around PTSD and seeking mental-health assistance, including the chain-teaching and Battlemind programs, are working.

“I think this study shows that we’ve done a pretty good job of reducing the stigma,” said Brig. Gen. Jones. “There’s several factors. Number one: the fact that over half the Soldiers who seek behavioral-health counseling do so within 30 days of the survey and do so on their own. They go in on their own and ask for the counseling. I think the response we’ve gotten to our Soldiers stepping up and saying yeah, I’d like some help is another indication that we’ve helped reduce that stigma.”

Oldtimer’s note:  The picture above is not part of the article.  Taken at the Korean War Memorial, it was released under creative commons license by icolman

Returning Vets: GI Bill Failing Them

Returning Veterans:

GI Bill Earns Dunce Cap 

GI Bill earns dunce capGI Bill earns Dunce Cap 

 I found this story in today’s @issue section of the Atlanta Journal- Constitution.   The author is Ellis Henican who is a columnist for Newsday.   He makes a point that returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan arrive to an ugly surprise – the highly touted education they were promised is still limping along essentially at World War II rates of funding compared to actual costs of an education.   The GI Bill is failing them and failing us for the promises we make for our heroes that go off to war.

He says what too many of us have been saying for it not to be true:  Our members of Congress from both parties are constantly saying how much they support our troops, yet once again, they shortchange our warriors when they come home.    Read the excerpts and then go back to the link above and read the entire article:

Returning Vets find GI Bill earns dunce cap

by Ellis Henican 

Newsday

Published on: 11/30/07

They’re coming home, the lucky ones are, pulling their lives back together after harrowing times in the war zone.   And the GI Bill is there to help them, same as it was for “the greatest generation,” who returned to civilian society after World War II.

Um, well, not exactly.

American vets now coming back from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq are facing an ugly surprise — and I don’t just mean the iffy health care at their local VA hospital. The educational benefits that sounded so alluring in those upbeat recruiting ads? They don’t come close to covering the real costs of college.

“Four hundred dollars? Are you kidding?” Army Reserve Spc. Sheila Pion said of her monthly stipend. “Just my textbooks cost $410.”

A seven-year reservist back home in Long Island City, N.Y., and attending John Jay College of Criminal Justice, Pion served at an Army hospital in Kuwait, tending to wounded soldiers. “It was important duty,” said Pion, 24. “I was happy to do it. But the whole point of me joining the military was to pay for my education. And the educational benefits are nothing like they lead you to believe.”

(…)

Under today’s GI Bill, regular-service combat vets get $1,101 a month, far less for fighting members of the National Guard and Reserve. No one’s going to Harvard or Columbia on that kind of money. And even to qualify, today’s soldiers are required to deposit $100 a month into their own education fund, months or years before they ever get a nickel back.

“A combat tax,” the troops have starting calling these paycheck deductions.

(…)  Read the rest at the link, please.

 “Supporting the troops”

should be more than just a slogan!

______________________________________________________

Note:  After posting this an hour or so ago, I came across this related information. 

Did you know that the “No Child Left Behind” act now carries a provision that requires primary schools (your child’s high school for example) to provide detailed contact information for every child in the school to military recruiters?

Military recruiters can blitz youngsters with uninvited phone calls to their homes and on-campus pitches replete with video war games. This is all possible under a little noted part of the law that requires schools to provide the names, addresses (campus addresses, too) and phone numbers of students or risk losing federal aid. The law provides an option to block the hard-sell recruitment – but only if parents demand in writing that the school deny this information to the military.

It is in the recruitment of lower middle class students, focused on minority blacks and Hispanics, where the education card is pushed hardest in order to meet the recruitment goals to fill the ranks of our military.  These are the kids most likely to see an educational opportunity as a blessing and also the most unlikely to realize that it will not be enough to get them a real education.  It is these recruits that are in most need that later find the GI Bill failing them most dramatically.

Oldtimer

 

Help lags for homeless female veterans

About 8,000 women veterans lack permanent shelter. Need is likely to rise as more women return from war.

By Bina Venkataraman | Correspondent of The Christian Science Monitor

Page 1 of 3  You will need to go to the link to see the rest of this story

Rachel Caesar, the first American-born in her family of immigrants from Trinidad, served in the National Guard and Army Reserve for 14 years. Today, three years after returning from a tour of duty in Afghanistan, she’s out of an apartment, out of work, and, on some days, ready to “run away and hide.”

Ms. Caesar still suffers from sleepless nights, jumpiness, and vivid flashbacks of weapon fire and land mine victims. In 2005, her doctors diagnosed her with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); soon after, she had to quit her customer service job of eight years.

After she fell behind in rent, she and her landlord agreed it was time for her to go. “I’m not sure how long I can stay here,” she says, of her mother’s house in the Dorchester neighborhood of Boston, where she and her two sons have been living for the past two months. “I would go to a shelter, but I don’t want to put my kids through that.”

Like many women who return from war, Caesar – who calls herself “on the verge of homelessness” – is struggling to adjust to civilian life, make ends meet, and find a permanent home.

An estimated 8,000 female veterans are homeless in the US – the most in the nation’s history and a number that is expected to increase as more women return from the war in Iraq. At the same time, services to help these women stay off the streets are lagging behind, say several experts who work with veterans’ issues.

“With the likelihood of more women veterans coming back from Iraq and Afghanistan with a need for housing, it’s going to be a major, major issue,” says Cheryl Beversdorf, executive director of the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans, noting that there isn’t enough housing to meet even current demands. “The VA is trying to gear up services for women, but frankly it’s not enough given what we are dealing with.”

Nearly 15 percent of the military is female, which partly explains the increase in female veterans and their homelessness. But of the 260 programs in the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans’ network that give counseling, shelter, and other services to homeless veterans, only eight have special programs for women.

Oldtimer’s comments.   Please read the rest of this important story at the link above.   It highlights the problems that women experience in the military and how that carries over to their civilian life as veterans.   One problem that the writer points out is that women are not adjusting well to considering themselves veterans, even though many of them are in intense combat situations in the military.   Also when they go to veteran’s centers, they are often the only woman in sight, but there are men everywhere.     Women want and need their own space.  Another comment by the writer: 

 “A woman who has served in the military is up to four times more likely to be homeless than a nonveteran woman.”

I believe that is true, and it makes women who served our country even more likely to be homeless than men.  Our veterans, men and women alike, are not being funded or served properly by our govenment.  If you think they are being well served, please read the articles above my banner.   They are based on true facts and you will find the sources there to verify it.  

 Men and Women Warriors, Whether Doing Well, Fallen, Homeless or in Poverty:

They are All Heroes to me!

We need to respect, honor and help them

For all homeless veteran articles 

For all homeless youth articles