Back from Iraq – and suddenly out on the streets

Soldiers coming back from Iraq and Afganistan are beginning to turn up homeless and on the streets in increasing numbers – homeless due in part to high housing costs, gaps in pay, loss of jobs, psychological problems such as PTSD.  The quotes and picture below come from a story researched and written by the Christian Science Monitor.  The story has been shortened here, so please read it in full at the link above.

Picture of Homeless Veteran  

HOME AGAIN: On returning from Iraq, Herold Noel faced the challenges of finding a home and tending to his family. He moved to New York with his wife and children, then became homeless. He now has a new apartment.   COREY SIPKIN/SPECIAL TO THE CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

By Alexandra Marks | Staff writer of The Christian Science Monitor

NEW YORK – Veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts are now showing up in the nation’s homeless shelters.   So far, dozens of them, like Herold Noel, a married father of three, have found themselves sleeping on the streets, on friends’ couches, or in their cars within weeks of returning home. Two years ago, Black Veterans for Social Justice (BVSJ) in the borough of Brooklyn, saw only a handful of recent returnees. Now the group is aiding more than 100 Iraq veterans, 30 of whom are homeless.

“It’s horrible to put your life on the line and then come back home to nothing, that’s what I came home to: nothing. I didn’t know where to go or where to turn,” says Mr. Noel. “I thought I was alone, but I found out there are a whole lot of other soldiers in the same situation. Now I want people to know what’s really going on.”

Part of the reason for these new veterans’ struggles is that housing costs have skyrocketed at the same time real wages have remained relatively stable, often putting rental prices out of reach. And for many, there is a gap of months, sometimes years, between when military benefits end and veterans benefits begin.

“We are very much committed to helping veterans coming back from this war,” says Mr. Cameron, executive director of Vietnam Veterans of California. “But the [Department of Veterans Affairs] already has needs it can’t meet and there’s a lot of fear out there that programs are going to be cut even further.”

Beyond the yellow ribbons

Both the Veterans Administration and private veterans service organizations are already stretched, providing services for veterans of previous conflicts. For instance, while an estimated 500,000 veterans were homeless at some time during 2004, the VA had the resources to tend to only 100,000 of them.

“You can have all of the yellow ribbons on cars that say ‘Support Our Troops’ that you want, but it’s when they take off the uniform and transition back to civilian life that they need support the most,” says Linda Boone, executive director of The National Coalition for Homeless Veterans.

After the Vietnam conflict, it was nine to 12 years before veterans began showing up at homeless shelters in large numbers. In part, that’s because the trauma they experienced during combat took time to surface, according to one Vietnam veteran who’s now a service provider. Doctors refer to the phenomenon as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

A recent study published by the New England Journal of Medicine found that 15 to 17 percent of Iraq vets meet “the screening criteria for major depression, generalized anxiety, or PTSD.” Of those, only 23 to 40 percent are seeking help – in part because so many others fear the stigma of having a mental disorder.

Many veterans’ service providers say they’re surprised to see so many Iraq veterans needing help so soon.

“This kind of inner city, urban guerrilla warfare that these veterans are facing probably accelerates mental-health problems,” says Yogin Ricardo Singh, director of the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program at BVSJ. “And then there’s the soldier’s mentality: Asking for help is like saying, ‘I’ve failed a mission.’ It’s very hard for them to do.”

Beyond PTSD and high housing costs, many veterans also face an income void, as they search for new jobs or wait for their veterans benefits to kick in.

When Mr. Noel was discharged in December of 2003, he and his family had been living in base housing in Georgia. Since they were no longer eligible to live there, they began the search for a new home. But Noel had trouble landing a job and the family moved to New York, hoping for help from a family member. Eventually, they split up: Noel’s wife and infant child moved in with his sister-in-law, and his twins were sent to relatives in Florida. Noel slept in his car, on the streets, and on friend’s couches.

Last spring he was diagnosed with PTSD, and though he’s currently in treatment, his disability claim is still being processed. Unable to keep a job so far, he’s had no steady income, although an anonymous donor provided money for him to take an apartment last week. He expects his family to join him soon.

‘Nobody understood … the way I was’

Nicole Goodwin is another vet diagnosed with PTSD who has yet to receive disability benefits. Unable to stay with her mother, she soon found herself walking the streets of New York, with a backpack full of her belongings and her 1-year-old daughter held close.

“When I first got back I just wanted to jump into a job and forget about Iraq, but the culture shock from the military to the civilian world hit me,” she says. “I was depressed for months. I couldn’t sleep. I couldn’t eat. The worst thing wasn’t the war, it was coming back, because nobody understood why I was the way I was.”

Ms. Goodwin was determined not to sleep on the streets, and so eventually went into the New York City shelter system where, after being shuffled from shelter to shelter, she was told she was ineligible for help. But media attention changed that, and she was able to obtain a rent voucher. With others’ generosity, she also found a job. She’s now attending college and working with other veterans who are determined to go to Washington with their stories.

“When soldiers get back, they should still be considered military until they can get on their feet,” she says. “It’s a month-to-month process, trying to actually function again. It’s not easy, it takes time.”

Oltimer’s comment:  These heroic men and women have been fighting for our safety and independance, our honor and our flag.  They deserve to be treated better!  Please write to your congressman and to the presidential candidates.   They need to understand what is happening now.

 Oldtimer

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